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Because We Are Catholic

February 1, 2017 Because We Are Catholic, Immigration, Publications

(PDF bulletin inserts in English and Spanish)

When Diana Campos first came to live in the U.S., she was only an infant.  

“I was born in Mexico and arrived in the U.S. a year later. I have lived here my whole life,” said Campos.

“Growing up undocumented I became accustomed to what it felt like to be an Americanized Mexican living in a society that did not fully accept me. I graduated from high school in 2012 and found myself with acceptance letters to colleges that I could not attend. I found myself driving in fear of being pulled over without my license.  A lack of a work permit made me feel useless and my future looked dark,” she said. “I was stripped of basic rights, I, as a person of faith, knew every person was born with.”

As the new Administration continues to take action, the future of the almost 11 million undocumented individuals in the United States has become uncertain.  An atmosphere of anxiety permeates some of our communities, where many fear their families will be torn apart and their lives shattered.

The Catholic Church believes that migrants must be welcomed with dignity and respect – as if we were greeting Christ himself.  Migrants leave their home countries for a variety of reasons, with many escaping life-threatening war zones and extreme poverty.  In the United States, and throughout the world, the Church devotes both pastoral and material assistance to “welcome the stranger.”

One of the most prominent worries is the fear that the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and Deferred Action for Parents of Americans (DAPA) programs will be eliminated. DACA and DAPA are designed to provide undocumented persons who were brought to the United States when they were children with temporary relief from deportation (deferred action).

“DACA changed my life and view on life completely,” said Campos. “It helped me re-establish my mental health and allow me to see that I am useful by giving me a work permit and a social security number. I felt safer and that with DACA I could now give back to this country that has given me so much.”

September 30, 2016 Because We Are Catholic, News

(PDF for Bulletin Inserts - English, En Español) Stanley “Tookie” Williams was one of the early leaders in the West Side Crips, a South Central Los Angeles street gang. An openly volatile and violent person, Williams was a drug addict, and had little regard for human life. In 1979, Williams was convicted of four murders, two with special circumstances for their heinous nature. He received the death penalty as punishment.

August 4, 2016 Because We Are Catholic, Publications

(PDF for Bulletin Inserts - English, En Español) During this Extraordinary Jubilee Year, Pope Francis has called on the Church to live out the Corporal Works of Mercy. Catholic churches in California, and around the world, have taken his call to heart in new, innovative ways as they have looked to serve the homeless in various parishes throughout the state. 

June 13, 2016 Because We Are Catholic, Publications

A controversial law – opposed by both political parties – went into effect last week. Instead of devising compassionate, informed and dignified end-of-life treatment, patients can now ask their physicians to prescribe a lethal dose of drugs instead.

Doctors, nurses, and other health care professionals and organizations – recognizing the fundamental shift in patient care this law entails – have announced they will not participate.  Instead, they are recommitting to better end-of-life care, better education for patients and families, and a better overall approach to treatment at the end of life.

May 10, 2016 Because We Are Catholic, Publications

The phone always seemed to ring in the middle of night. “Can you take just one more? It will just be for one night.” The answer was always yes then cookies and milk was set out.

The children were often petrified when they arrived at the door.  But a loving smile, a nice bed, clean pajamas and a bedtime story calmed their fears.

April 12, 2016 Because We Are Catholic, Publications

National Crime Victims' Week - Helping Victims Heal

Jennifer Balber was only working for Southern California Gas Company for a few months. She had just returned to school and started working two jobs to help finance her education. Living back at home with her mom, she was hopeful about her future despite a recent health setback. Ever the optimist, Jen’s sunny disposition always put others at ease.

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